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OnVideo's Guide to Blu-ray Debuts


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    June 6
  • Juice

    (1992) Omar Epps, Tupac Shakur, Jermaine 'Huggy' Hopkins, Khalil Kain, Vincent Laresca, Samuel L. Jackson, Queen Latifah, Cindy Herron. A powerful morality tale steeped in 90s urban culture, "Juice" marked the feature directorial debut of Spike Lee’s acclaimed cinematographer Ernest R. Dickerson and the first starring roles for Omar Epps and an electrifying Tupac Shakur. Twenty-five years later, the gritty and influential film continues to be celebrated for its realistic portrayal of Harlem life, the early New York hip-hop scene, and the fate of four friends in pursuit of the power and respect they call the Juice. Extras: Commentary by director Ernest R. Dickerson; "You’ve Got the Juice Now," a look back at the making of the film featuring new interviews with Dickerson, producer David Heyman and actors Epps, Khalil Kain and Jermaine Hopkins. The piece details Dickerson’s struggle to remain true to his original vision, his desire to cast fresh new talent, the challenges of shooting on location in Harlem, and the reasons why the film’s ending was changed; "The Wrecking Crew" behind-the-scenes interview featurette with the film’s surviving lead actors; "Sip the Juice: The Music" featurette explores the essential role that music plays in the film, featuring vintage interviews with the Shocklee brothers about their score, as well as Erik B, EPMD, and members of Cypress Hill; "Stay in the Scene: The Interview" vintage interview with the four lead cast members on set; set photo gallery. (Paramount).

  • Ugetsu

    (1953) Having refined his craft in the silent era, Kenji Mizoguchi was an elder statesman of Japanese cinema -- fiercely revered by Akira Kurosawa and other younger directors -- by the time he made "Ugetsu." And with this exquisite ghost story, a fatalistic wartime tragedy derived from stories by Akinari Ueda and Guy de Maupassant, he created a touchstone of his art, his long takes and sweeping camera guiding the viewer through a delirious narrative about two villagers whose pursuit of fame and fortune leads them far astray from their loyal wives. Moving between the terrestrial and the otherworldly, "Ugetsu" reveals essential truths about the ravages of war, the plight of women, and the pride of men. New 4K digital restoration undertaken by The Film Foundation, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack. Extras: Audio commentary by filmmaker, critic, and festival programmer Tony Rayns; "Kenji Mizoguchi: The Life of a Film Director" (1975), a 150-minute documentary by Kaneto Shindo; "Two Worlds Intertwined," a 2005 appreciation of Ugetsu by filmmaker Masahiro Shinoda; "Process and Production," a 2005 interview with Tokuzo Tanaka, first assistant director on "Ugetsu"; interview from 1992 with cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa; trailers; an essay by film critic Phillip Lopate and three short stories that influenced Mizoguchi in making the film. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for Where The Buffalo Roam BLU-RAY DEBUT

    Where The Buffalo Roam

    (1980) Comedy legend Bill Murray is at his wildest as America's leading "Gonzo" journalist, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, the legendary underground reporter whose passion for writing was second only to his love of weird chemicals, alcohol, violence and insanity. Along with his best friend Carl Lazlo, Esq. (Peter Boyle), Thompson takes us on a manic look back at the Sixties and Seventies as an eyewitness to everything from a free-for-all San Francisco drug trial to a one-on-one bathroom interview with then Presidential candidate Richard Nixon. This off-the-wall comedy also boasts a musical score by rock superstar Neil Young. Extras: New "Inventing the Buffalo: An Interview with Screenwriter John Kaye," original theatrical trailer. (Shout! Factory Shout Select).


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    June 13
  • photo for Cheech and Chong's Next Movie BLU-RAY DEBUT

    Cheech and Chong's Next Movie

    (1980) In his follow-up to 1978's "Up in Smoke," the zany pair is back for some smoke-enhanced misadventures. Cheech must deal with an angry neighbor and losing his job, all while trying to score with a sexy young lady. Meanwhile, Chong meets Cheech's cousin, Red (Cheech Mann in a dual role), and the two buds have a wild time buzzing around Hollyweird in a bad Ferrari. Along the way, the dynamic duo find time for some mishaps at a movie set, the welfare office, a hotel, a brothel, a music store, a rich girl's house, a comedy club, the ultimate weed field and on a UFO! Features early film appearances by Paul "Pee-wee Herman" Reubens, Edie McClurg, Cassandra "Elvira" Peterson, John "Jambi" Paragon and Phil Hartman. Extras: New interview with Cheech Martin, trailer, radio spots. (Shout! Factory Shout Select).

  • They Live By Night

    (1948) Legendary director Nicholas Ray began his career with this lyrical film noir, the first in a series of existential genre films overflowing with sympathy for America’s outcasts and underdogs. When the wide-eyed fugitive Bowie (Farley Granger), having broken out of prison with some bank robbers, meets the innocent Keechie (Cathy O’Donnell), each recognizes something in the other that no one else ever has. The young lovers envision a new, decent life together, but as they flee the cops and contend with Bowie’s fellow outlaws, who aren’t about to let him go straight, they realize there’s nowhere left to run. Ray brought an outsider’s sensibility honed in the theater to this debut, using revolutionary camera techniques and naturalistic performances to craft a profoundly romantic crime drama that paved the way for decades of lovers-on-the-run thrillers to come. New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack. Extras: Audio commentary featuring film historian Eddie Muller and actor Farley Granger; new video interview with film critic Imogen Sara Smith; short piece from 2007 with film critic Molly Haskell, filmmakers Christopher Coppola and Oliver Stone, and film noir specialists Alain Silver and James Ursini; illustrated audio interview excerpts from 1956 with producer John Houseman; a new essay by film scholar Bernard Eisenschitz. (The Criterion Collection).



    June 20
  • photo for Car Wash BLU-RAY DEBUT

    Car Wash

    (1976) It's just a typical day in the lives of the employees, customers and passersby of a Los Angeles car wash. There's a would-be robbery ... an assembly line of the weirdest, baddest, shadiest characters you've ever met ... and lots of '70s music to pass the hours till quitting time. Featuring outrageous performances by George Carlin, Professor Irwin Corey, the Pointer Sisters, and Richard Pryor as Daddy Rich -- a flamboyant reverend who preaches the goodness of the dollar -- "Car Wash" is a cult classic celebrating an era devoted to living life in the fast lane. Extras: New "Workin' at the Car Wash with Otis Day" featurette, New "Car Wash From Start to Finish with Gary Stromberg' featurette, commentary with director Michael Schultz, radio spots, trailer. (Shout! Factory Shout Select).

  • The Marseille Trilogy

    In the 1930s, Marcel Pagnol, a leading light of the Paris theater, set out for new horizons as a filmmaker in his native Provence. His early masterpieces "Marius" (1931), "Fanny" (1932) and "César" (1936) mix theatrical stagecraft with realistic location photography to create an epic love story from the fabric of everyday life. Gruff, sentimental César (music-hall star Raimu) owns a waterfront bar in the old port of Marseille, where his son, Marius (Pierre Fresnay), wipes down tables and dreams of a life at sea. The prosperous, middle-aged sailmaker Panisse (Fernand Charpin), wanting to wed Marius’s sweetheart, Fanny (Orane Demazis), sets up a generation-spanning romantic triangle, the story of which unfolds in a series of fateful twists in the films of "The Marseille Trilogy," which first earned Pagnol his place in cinema history. “If Pagnol is not the greatest auteur of the sound film,” critic André Bazin wrote, “he is in any case something akin to its genius.” New 4K digital restorations of all three films, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks. Extras: New introduction by filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier; new interview with Nicolas Pagnol, writer-director Marcel Pagnol’s grandson; segments of "Marcel Pagnol: Morceaux de choisis," a 1973 documentary series on Pagnol’s life and work; short documentary on the Marseille harbor by Pagnol; archival interviews with actors Orane Demazis, Pierre Fresnay, and Robert Vattier; "Pagnol’s Poetic Realism," a new video essay by scholar Brett Bowles; French television clip about the restoration of the trilogy; theatrical rerelease trailer; an essay by film critic Michael Atkinson and excerpts from Pagnol’s memoirs. (The Criterion Collection).


    June 27
  • The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog

    (1927) With his third feature film, "The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog," Alfred Hitchcock took a major step toward greatness and made what he would come to consider his true directorial debut. This haunting silent thriller tells the tale of a mysterious young man (matinee idol Ivor Novello) who takes up residence at a London boardinghouse, just as a killer who preys on blonde women, known as the Avenger, descends upon the city. The film is animated by the palpable energy of a young stylist at play, decisively establishing the director’s formal and thematic obsessions. In this edition, "The Lodger" is accompanied by "Downhill," another 1927 silent exploration of Hitchcock’s “wrong man” trope, also headlined by Novello -- making for a double feature that reveals the great master of the macabre as he was just coming into his own. 2K digital restoration, with a new score by composer Neil Brand, performed by the Orchestra of Saint Paul’s. Extras: "Downhill, director Alfred Hitchcock’s 1927 feature film starring Ivor Novello, in a 2K digital restoration with a new piano score by Brand; new interview with film scholar William Rothman on Hitchcock’s visual signatures; new video essay by art historian Steven Jacobs about Hitchcock’s use of architecture; excerpts from audio interviews with Hitchcock by filmmakers François Truffaut (1962) and Peter Bogdanovich (1963); radio adaptation of "The Lodger" from 1940, directed by Hitchcock; new interview with Brand on composing for silent film; essays on "The Lodger"and "Downhill" by critic Philip Kemp. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for The Pink Panther Film Collection

    The Pink Panther Film Collection

    Six-disc Blu-ray set with "The Pink Panther" (1964), "A Shot in the Dark"(1964), "The Return of the Pink Panther" (1975), "The Pink Panther Strikes Again" (1976), "Revenge of the Pink Panther" (1978) and "Trail of the Pink Panther" (1982). Includes a 24-page book with an essay by animation historian and film critic Jerry Beck. Formats: Blu-ray Disc. Extras: New interviews with cast and crew members, audio commentaries, rare theatrical trailers, TV spots, stills galleries, more. (Shout! Factory Shout Select).

  • Running on Empty

    (1988) River Phoenix rose to stardom (and a nomination) in this poignant drama from director Sidney Lumet. Ex-radicals Judd Hirsch and Christine Lahti have raised their family in hiding, constantly moving and changing aliases to flee facing photo for Running on Emptycharges from an inadvertent crime they committed as war protestors 15 years earlier. As their eldest son (Phoenix) comes of age, he is torn between running with his beloved fugitive parents, or developing his musical talents and pursuing his own life, which includes a new girlfriend (Martha Plimpton). The chemistry on display between the two young stars still burns the screen decades later. (Warner).

  • Straw Dogs

    (1971) In this thriller, arguably Sam Peckinpah’s most controversial film, David (Dustin Hoffman), a young American mathematician, moves with his English wife, Amy (Susan George), to the village where she grew up. Their sense of safety unravels as the local men David has hired to repair their house prove more interested in leering at Amy and intimidating David, beginning an agonizing initiation into the iron laws of violent masculinity that govern Peckinpah’s world. Working outside the U.S. for the first time, the filmmaker airlifts the ruthlessness of the Western frontier into Cornwall in "Straw Dogs," pushing his characters to their breaking points as the men brutalize Amy and David discovers how far he’ll go to protect his home -- culminating in a harrowing climax that lays out this cinematic mastermind’s eloquent and bloody vision of humanity. New, restored 4K digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack. Extras: Audio commentary from 2003 by Stephen Prince, author of "Savage Cinema: Sam Peckinpah and the Rise of Ultraviolent Movies"; "Mantrap: 'Straw Dogs' --The Final Cut," a 2003 documentary about the making of the film, featuring cast and crew; "Sam Peckinpah: Man of Iron," a 1993 documentary about the director featuring actors Kris Kristofferson, Jason Robards, Ali MacGraw, and many others; new conversation between film critic Michael Sragow and filmmaker Roger Spottiswoode, who worked as one of the editors on the film; new interview with film scholar Linda Williams about the controversies surrounding the film; archival interviews with actor Susan George, producer Daniel Melnick, and Peckinpah biographer Garner Simmons; behind-the-scenes footage; TV spots and trailers; an essay by scholar and critic Joshua Clover. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for Trespass BLU-RAY DEBUT

    Trespass

    (1992) Bill Paxton, William Sadler, Ice-T, Ice Cube. In the rubble of a four-alarm blaze, two Arkansas firemen (Paxton and Sadler) discover a map leading to a fortune in stolen gold hidden in an abandoned East St. Louis tenement. What they don't know is the building is headquarters to a vicious mob, led by the notorious King James (Ice-T) and Savon (Ice Cube). When the firefighters accidentally witness the mob executing some of their enemies, they become the gang's next targets. Extras: New "Fool's Gold" interview with actor William Sadler, new "Born Losers" interview with co-writer Bob Gale, new "Wrongful Entry" interview with producer Neil Canton, new "Gang Violation" stunts featurette, new "Trigger Happy" weapons featurette, vintage featurette: "Behind the Scenes of Trespass," music video, deleted scenes, theatrical trailer. (Shout! Factory Shout Select).



    July 11
  • photo for L'argent

    L'argent

    (1983 -- France) In his ruthlessly clear-eyed final film, French master Robert Bresson pushed his unique blend of spiritual rumination and formal rigor to a new level of astringency. Transposing a Tolstoy novella to contemporary Paris, "L’argent" follows a counterfeit bill as it originates as a prop in a schoolboy prank, then circulates like a virus among the corrupt and the virtuous alike before landing with a young truck driver and leading him to incarceration and violence. With brutal economy, Bresson constructs his unforgiving vision of original sin out of starkly perceived details, rooting his characters in a dehumanizing material world that withholds any hope of transcendence. Formats: DVD, Blu-ray Disc with a new, restored 4K digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: Press conference from the 1983 Cannes Film Festival; “L’argent, A to Z," a new video essay by film scholar James Quandt; trailer; an essay by critic Adrian Martin and a newly expanded 1983 interview with director Robert Bresson by critic Michel Ciment. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

    Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

    Roberto Rossellini is one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. And it was with his trilogy of films made during and after World War II -- "Rome Open City" (1945), "Paisan" (1946), and "Germany Year Zero" (1948) -- that he left his first transformative mark on cinema. With their stripped-down aesthetic, largely nonprofessional casts, and unorthodox approaches to storytelling, these intensely emotional works were international sensations and came to define the neorealist movement. Shot in battle-ravaged Italy and Germany, these three films are some of our most lasting, humane documents of devastated postwar Europe, containing universal images of both tragedy and hope. Special Edition three-disc set with new high-definition digital restorations, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks. Extras: Introductions by Roberto Rossellini to all three films; interviews from 2009 with Rossellini scholar Adriano Aprà, film critic and Rossellini friend Father Virgilio Fantuzzi, and filmmakers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani; audio commentary from 2009 on "Rome Open City" by film scholar Peter Bondanella; "Once Upon a Time ... Rome Open City,” a 2006 documentary on the making of this historic film, featuring rare archival material and footage of Anna Magnani, Federico Fellini, Ingrid Bergman, and many others; "Rossellini and the City," a 2009 video essay by film scholar Mark Shiel on Rossellini’s use of the urban landscape in "The War Trilogy"; excerpts from rarely seen videotaped discussions Rossellini had in 1970 about his craft with faculty and students at Rice University; "Into the Future," a 2009 video essay about "The War Trilogy" by film scholar Tag Gallagher; "Roberto Rossellini," a 2001 documentary by Carlo Lizzani, assistant director on "Germany Year Zero," tracing Rossellini’s career through archival footage and interviews with family members and collaborators, with tributes by filmmakers François Truffaut and Martin Scorsese; "Letters from the Front: Carlo Lizzani on Germany Year Zero,” a podium discussion with Lizzani from the 1987 Tutto Rossellini conference; Italian credits and prologue from "Germany Year Zero"; essays by James Quandt, Irene Bignardi, Colin McCabe, and Jonathan Rosenbaum. (The Criterion Collection).


    July 18
  • photo for Stalker

    Stalker

    (1979 -- USSR) Andrei Tarkovsky’s final Soviet feature is a metaphysical journey through an enigmatic postapocalyptic landscape, and a rarefied cinematic experience like no other. A hired guide—the Stalker—leads a writer and a scientist into the heart of the Zone, the restricted site of a long-ago disaster, where the three men eventually zero in on the Room, a place rumored to fulfill one’s most deeply held desires. Adapting a science-fiction novel by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, Tarkovsky created an immersive world with a wealth of material detail and a sense of organic atmosphere. A religious allegory, a reflection of contemporaneous political anxieties, a meditation on film itself—Stalker envelops the viewer by opening up a multitude of possible meanings. Formats: DVD, Blu-ray Disc, with a new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interview with Geoff Dyer, author of "Zona: A Book About a Film About a Journey to a Room"; interview from 2002 with cinematographer Alexander Knyazhinsky; interview from 2002 with set designer Rashit Safiullin; interview from 2002 with composer Eduard Artemyev; an essay by critic Mark Le Fanu. (The Criterion Collection).


    July 25
  • photo for Lost in America

    Lost in America

    (1985) In this hysterical satire of Reagan-era values, written and directed by Albert Brooks, a successful Los Angeles advertising executive (Brooks) and his wife (Julie Hagerty) decide to quit their jobs, buy a Winnebago, and follow their Easy Rider fantasies of freedom and the open road. When a stop in Las Vegas nearly derails their plans, they’re forced to come to terms with their own limitations and those of the American dream. Brooks’s barbed wit and confident direction drive "Lost in America," an iconic example of his restless movies about insecure characters searching for satisfaction in the modern world that established his unique comic voice and transformed the art of observational humor. Formats: DVD, Blu-ray Disc, with a new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New conversation with director Albert Brooks and filmmaker Robert Weide; new interviews with actor Julie Hagerty, executive producer Herb Nanas, and comic writer and director James L. Brooks; trailer; an essay by critic Scott Tobias. (The Criterion Collection).


    August 8
  • The Breaking Point

    photo for The Breaking Point (1950) Michael Curtiz brings a master skipper’s hand to the helm of this thriller, Hollywood’s second crack at Ernest Hemingway’s "To Have and Have Not." John Garfield stars as Harry Morgan, an honest charter-boat captain who, facing hard times, takes on dangerous cargo to save his boat, support his family, and preserve his dignity. Left in the lurch by a freeloading passenger, Harry starts to entertain the criminal propositions of a sleazy lawyer (Wallace Ford), as well as the playful come-ons of a cheeky blonde (Patricia Neal), making a series of compromises that stretch his morality -- and his marriage -- farther than he’ll admit. Hewing closer to Hemingway’s novel than Howard Hawks’s Bogart-Bacall vehicle, "The Breaking Point" charts a course through daylight noir and working-class tragedy, guided by Curtiz’s effortless visual fluency and a stoic, career-capping performance from Garfield. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interview with biographer and film historian Alan K. Rode ("Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film"); new piece featuring actor and acting instructor Julie Garfield speaking about her father, actor John Garfield; new video essay by filmmakers Tony Zhou and Taylor Ramos, analyzing Curtiz’s directorial techniques; excerpts from a 1962 episode of the "Today" show showing contents of the Ernest Hemingway House in Key West, Florida, including items related to "To Have and Have Not," the novel on which "The Breaking Point" is based; trailer; an essay by critic Stephanie Zacharek. (The Criterion Collection).


    August 15
  • Hopscotch

    photo for Hopscotch (1980) The inimitable comic team of Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson star in this nimble tale of international intrigue from master British filmmaker Ronald Neame. Based on Brian Garfield’s best-selling novel, the blithe thriller centers on Miles Kendig (Matthau), a disillusioned retired CIA agent who, with the help of a chic and savvy Viennese widow (Jackson), threatens to publish his memoirs and expose the innermost secrets of every major intelligence agency in the world. Despite being in major hot water with his former colleagues, Kendig refuses to get in line -- he’s having too much fun. Set to the sounds of Mozart, this lighthearted sendup of the paranoid dramas of its era is an expertly crafted, singular take on the spy movie. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: Interviews from 2002 with director Ronald Neame and writer Brian Garfield; Walter Matthau in a 1980 appearance on "The Dick Cavett Show"; trailer and teaser; optional broadcast television audio track for family viewing; an essay by critic Glenn Kenny. (The Criterion Collection).

  • Meantime

    photo for Meantime (1984) A slow-burning depiction of economic degradation in Thatcher’s England, Mike Leigh’s "Meantime" was the culmination of the writer-director’s pioneering work in television and became his breakthrough theatrical release. Unemployment is rampant in London’s working-class East End, where a middle-aged couple and their two sons languish in a claustrophobic public housing flat. As the brothers (Phil Daniels and Tim Roth) grow increasingly disaffected, Leigh punctuates the grinding boredom of their daily existence with tense encounters, including with a priggish aunt (Marion Bailey) who has managed to become middle-class and a blithering skinhead on the verge of psychosis (a scene-stealing Gary Oldman, in his first major role). Informed by Leigh’s now trademark improvisational process and propelled by the lurching rhythms of its Beckett-like dialogue, " Meantime" is an unrelenting, often blisteringly funny look at life on the dole. On DVD and Blu-ray, with New, restored 2K digital transfer, supervised by cinematographer Roger Pratt and director Mike Leigh, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New conversation between Leigh and musician Jarvis Cocker; new conversation between actor Marion Bailey and critic Amy Raphael; an essay by film scholar Sean O’Sullivan. (The Criterion Collection).


    August 22
  • La poison

    photo for La poison (1951 -- France) The writer, actor, and director Sacha Guitry emerged from the theater to become one of France’s best-known and most inventive filmmakers, and "La poison" marked his first collaboration with another titan of the screen, the incomparably expressive Michel Simon. With Guitry’s witty dialogue and fleet pacing, the black comedy is the quintessential depiction of a marriage gone sour: after 30 years together, a village gardener (Simon) and his wife (Germaine Reuver) find themselves contemplating how to do away with each other, with the former even planning how he’ll negotiate his eventual criminal trial. Inspired by Guitry’s own post–World War II tangle with the law -- a wrongful charge of collaborationism -- "La poison" is a blithely caustic broadside against the French legal system and a society all too eager to capitalize on others’ misfortunes. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray Extras: New interview with filmmaker Olivier Assayas on director Sacha Guitry’s influence on French cinema; "On Life On-screen: Miseries and Splendour of a Monarch," a 60-minute documentary from 2010 on the collaboration of Guitry and Michel Simon; an essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau and a 1957 obituary for Guitry by François Truffaut. (The Criterion Collection).

  • Sid & Nancy

    photo for Sid & Nancy (1986) With the lacerating love story "Sid & Nancy," Alex Cox reimagines the crash-and-burn affair between punk’s most notorious self-destructive poster children: Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious and his girlfriend, Nancy Spungen -- brought to visceral life by brilliant performances from Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb. Cox turns his anarchic filmmaking style on the explosive energy of the London punk scene and the degenerate streets of seventies New York, making for an eviscerating depiction of excess and addiction. Through the lens of cinematographer Roger Deakins, the imagery goes from swooning to grimy, and the film’s bleakness is balanced with surreal humor and genuine tenderness, making for an affecting, music-fueled vision of doomed love. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed stereo soundtrack on the Blu-ray; alternate 5.1 surround soundtrack, presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray. Extras: Two audio commentaries: one from 1994 featuring co-writer Abbe Wool, actors Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb, cultural historian Greil Marcus, filmmakers Julien Temple and Lech Kowalski, and musician Eliot Kidd; the other from 2001 featuring co-writer-director Alex Cox and actor Andrew Schofield; "England’s Glory," a 1987 documentary on the making of "Sid & Nancy"; infamous 1976 Bill Grundy interview with the Sex Pistols on British television; rare telephone interview from 1978 with Sid Vicious; interviews with Vicious and Nancy Spungen from the 1980 documentary "D.O.A.: A Right of Passage"; archival interviews and footage; an essay by author Jon Savage and a 1986 piece compiled by Cox about Vicious, Spungen, and the making of the film. (The Criterion Collection).


    September 26
  • photo for Othello

    Othello

    (1952/1955) Gloriously cinematic despite being made on a tiny budget, Orson Welles's "Othello" is a testament to the filmmaker's stubborn willingness to pursue his vision to the ends of the earth. Unmatched in his passionate identification with Shakespeare's imagination, Welles brings his inventive visual approach to this enduring tragedy of jealousy, bigotry, and rage, and also gives a towering performance as the Moor of Venice, alongside Suzanne Cloutier as his innocent wife, Desdemona, and Micheál MacLiammóir as the scheming Iago. Shot over the course of three years in Morocco, Venice, Tuscany, and Rome and plagued by many logistical problems, this fiercely independent film joins "Macbeth" and "Chimes at Midnight" in making the case for Welles as the cinema's most audacious interpreter of the Bard. New, restored 4K digital transfers of two versions of the film, the 1952 European version and the 1955 U.S. version, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks. Extras: Audio commentary featuring filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich and Orson Welles scholar Myron Meisel; "Return to Glennascaul," a 1953 short film made by MacLiammóir and actor Hilton Edwards during a hiatus from shooting "Othello"; new interview with Welles biographer Simon Callow; new interview with Welles scholar François Thomas on the differences between the two versions; new interview with Ayanna Thompson, author of "Passing Strange: Shakespeare, Race, and Contemporary America"; interview from 2014 with Welles scholar Joseph McBride; an essay by film critic Geoffrey O'Brien. (The Criterion Collection).


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