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OnVideo's Guide to Blu-ray Debuts


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    August 1
    photo for Slither BLU-RAY DEBUT
  • Slither

    (2006) Nathan Fillion, Michael Rooker, Elizabeth Banks, Gregg Henry. The sleepy town of Wheelsy could be any small town in America -- somewhat quaint and gentle, peopled with friendly folks who mind their own business. But just beneath the surface charm, something unnamed and evil has arrived ... and is growing. Intent on devouring all life on Earth, this dark and slimy entity is infecting anyone in its path. Now it's up to the local sheriff, Bill Pardy (Nathan), and his team to stop the spread of rampant devastation -- and shocking mutilation -- before it's too late. Outrageously funny horror film from James Gunn, co-writer and director of "Guardians of the Galaxy" and "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2." Extras: New audio commentary with writer-director James Gunn and actors Nathan Fillion and Michael Rooker; new "The Genesis of SLITHER" featurette; new "The Other MacReady" featurette; audio commentary with Gunn and Fillion; deleted and extended scenes; "Visual Effects: Step by Step"; "Slithery Set Tour" with Fillion; "The Sick Minds and Slimy Days of SLITHER" featurette; "Brewing the Blood -- How to Make Blood" featurette; "Bringing SLITHER’s Creatures to Life" featurette; Lloyd Kaufman’s video diary; gag reel; "Who is Bill Pardy?" featurette; theatrical trailer. (Scream Factory).


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    August 8
  • The Breaking Point

    photo for The Breaking Point (1950) Michael Curtiz brings a master skipper’s hand to the helm of this thriller, Hollywood’s second crack at Ernest Hemingway’s "To Have and Have Not." John Garfield stars as Harry Morgan, an honest charter-boat captain who, facing hard times, takes on dangerous cargo to save his boat, support his family, and preserve his dignity. Left in the lurch by a freeloading passenger, Harry starts to entertain the criminal propositions of a sleazy lawyer (Wallace Ford), as well as the playful come-ons of a cheeky blonde (Patricia Neal), making a series of compromises that stretch his morality -- and his marriage -- farther than he’ll admit. Hewing closer to Hemingway’s novel than Howard Hawks’s Bogart-Bacall vehicle, "The Breaking Point" charts a course through daylight noir and working-class tragedy, guided by Curtiz’s effortless visual fluency and a stoic, career-capping performance from Garfield. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interview with biographer and film historian Alan K. Rode ("Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film"); new piece featuring actor and acting instructor Julie Garfield speaking about her father, actor John Garfield; new video essay by filmmakers Tony Zhou and Taylor Ramos, analyzing Curtiz’s directorial techniques; excerpts from a 1962 episode of the "Today" show showing contents of the Ernest Hemingway House in Key West, Florida, including items related to "To Have and Have Not," the novel on which "The Breaking Point" is based; trailer; an essay by critic Stephanie Zacharek. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for Teen Wolf

    Teen Wolf (Collector’s Edition)

    (1985) Michael J Fox. New high-definition film transfer taken from the interpositive. Extras: "Never. Say. Die. The Story of Teen Wolf," original theatrical trailer, still gallery. (Shout! Factory).

  • Teen Wolf Too (Collector’s Edition)

    (1987) Jason Bateman. Extras: "Working with the Wolf" interview with director Christopher Leitch; "Otherworldly" interview with co-star Kim Darby; "A Man of Great ‘Stiles’" interview with co-star Stuart Fratkin; "Nerdy Girl Saves the Day" interview with co-star Estee Chandler; :A Wolf in ‘80s Clothing" look at the wardrobe of "Teen Wolf Too" with costume designer Heidi Kaczenski; still gallery. (Shout! Factory).



    August 15
  • Hopscotch

    photo for Hopscotch (1980) The inimitable comic team of Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson star in this nimble tale of international intrigue from master British filmmaker Ronald Neame. Based on Brian Garfield’s best-selling novel, the blithe thriller centers on Miles Kendig (Matthau), a disillusioned retired CIA agent who, with the help of a chic and savvy Viennese widow (Jackson), threatens to publish his memoirs and expose the innermost secrets of every major intelligence agency in the world. Despite being in major hot water with his former colleagues, Kendig refuses to get in line -- he’s having too much fun. Set to the sounds of Mozart, this lighthearted sendup of the paranoid dramas of its era is an expertly crafted, singular take on the spy movie. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: Interviews from 2002 with director Ronald Neame and writer Brian Garfield; Walter Matthau in a 1980 appearance on "The Dick Cavett Show"; trailer and teaser; optional broadcast television audio track for family viewing; an essay by critic Glenn Kenny. (The Criterion Collection).

  • Meantime

    photo for Meantime (1984) A slow-burning depiction of economic degradation in Thatcher’s England, Mike Leigh’s "Meantime" was the culmination of the writer-director’s pioneering work in television and became his breakthrough theatrical release. Unemployment is rampant in London’s working-class East End, where a middle-aged couple and their two sons languish in a claustrophobic public housing flat. As the brothers (Phil Daniels and Tim Roth) grow increasingly disaffected, Leigh punctuates the grinding boredom of their daily existence with tense encounters, including with a priggish aunt (Marion Bailey) who has managed to become middle-class and a blithering skinhead on the verge of psychosis (a scene-stealing Gary Oldman, in his first major role). Informed by Leigh’s now trademark improvisational process and propelled by the lurching rhythms of its Beckett-like dialogue, " Meantime" is an unrelenting, often blisteringly funny look at life on the dole. On DVD and Blu-ray, with New, restored 2K digital transfer, supervised by cinematographer Roger Pratt and director Mike Leigh, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New conversation between Leigh and musician Jarvis Cocker; new conversation between actor Marion Bailey and critic Amy Raphael; an essay by film scholar Sean O’Sullivan. (The Criterion Collection).


    August 15
  • La poison

    photo for La poison (1951 -- France) The writer, actor, and director Sacha Guitry emerged from the theater to become one of France’s best-known and most inventive filmmakers, and "La poison" marked his first collaboration with another titan of the screen, the incomparably expressive Michel Simon. With Guitry’s witty dialogue and fleet pacing, the black comedy is the quintessential depiction of a marriage gone sour: after 30 years together, a village gardener (Simon) and his wife (Germaine Reuver) find themselves contemplating how to do away with each other, with the former even planning how he’ll negotiate his eventual criminal trial. Inspired by Guitry’s own post–World War II tangle with the law -- a wrongful charge of collaborationism -- "La poison" is a blithely caustic broadside against the French legal system and a society all too eager to capitalize on others’ misfortunes. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray Extras: New interview with filmmaker Olivier Assayas on director Sacha Guitry’s influence on French cinema; "On Life On-screen: Miseries and Splendour of a Monarch," a 60-minute documentary from 2010 on the collaboration of Guitry and Michel Simon; an essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau and a 1957 obituary for Guitry by François Truffaut. (The Criterion Collection).

  • Sid & Nancy

    photo for Sid & Nancy (1986) With the lacerating love story "Sid & Nancy," Alex Cox reimagines the crash-and-burn affair between punk’s most notorious self-destructive poster children: Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious and his girlfriend, Nancy Spungen -- brought to visceral life by brilliant performances from Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb. Cox turns his anarchic filmmaking style on the explosive energy of the London punk scene and the degenerate streets of seventies New York, making for an eviscerating depiction of excess and addiction. Through the lens of cinematographer Roger Deakins, the imagery goes from swooning to grimy, and the film’s bleakness is balanced with surreal humor and genuine tenderness, making for an affecting, music-fueled vision of doomed love. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed stereo soundtrack on the Blu-ray; alternate 5.1 surround soundtrack, presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray. Extras: Two audio commentaries: one from 1994 featuring co-writer Abbe Wool, actors Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb, cultural historian Greil Marcus, filmmakers Julien Temple and Lech Kowalski, and musician Eliot Kidd; the other from 2001 featuring co-writer-director Alex Cox and actor Andrew Schofield; "England’s Glory," a 1987 documentary on the making of "Sid & Nancy"; infamous 1976 Bill Grundy interview with the Sex Pistols on British television; rare telephone interview from 1978 with Sid Vicious; interviews with Vicious and Nancy Spungen from the 1980 documentary "D.O.A.: A Right of Passage"; archival interviews and footage; an essay by author Jon Savage and a 1986 piece compiled by Cox about Vicious, Spungen, and the making of the film. (The Criterion Collection).



    September 5
  • Rebecca

    photo for Rebecca (1940) Romance becomes psychodrama in Alfred Hitchcock’s elegantly crafted "Rebecca," his first foray into Hollywood filmmaking. A dreamlike adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel, the film stars the enchanting Joan Fontaine as a young woman who believes she has found her heart’s desire when she marries the dashing aristocratic widower Maxim de Winter (played with cunning vulnerability by Laurence Olivier). But upon moving to Manderley -- her groom’s baroque ancestral mansion -- she soon learns that his deceased wife haunts not only the home but the temperamental, brooding Maxim as well. The start of Hitchcock’s legendary collaboration with producer David O. Selznick, this elegiac gothic vision, captured in stunning black and white by George Barnes, took home the Academy Awards for best picture and best cinematography. On DVD and Blu-ray, with new 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: Audio commentary from 1990 featuring film scholar Leonard J. Leff; isolated music and effects track; new conversation between film critic and author Molly Haskell and scholar Patricia White; new interview with special effects historian Craig Barron on the visual effects in Rebecca; documentary from 2007 on the making of Rebecca; screen, hair, makeup, and costume tests including actors Joan Fontaine, Anne Baxter, Vivien Leigh, Margaret Sullavan, and Loretta Young; casting gallery annotated by director Alfred Hitchcock and producer David O. Selznick; television interviews with Hitchcock and Fontaine from 1973 and 1980; audio interviews from 1986 with actor Judith Anderson and Fontaine; three radio adaptations of "Rebecca," from 1938, 1941, and 1950, including Orson Welles’s version for the Mercury Theatre; theatrical rerelease trailer; an essay by critic and Selznick biographer David Thomson and selected production correspondence, including letters between Hitchcock and Selznick. (The Criterion Collection).


    September 12
  • Festival

    photo for Festival (1967) Before "Woodstock" and "Monterey Pop," there was "Festival." From 1963 to 1966, Murray Lerner visited the annual Newport Folk Festival to document a thriving, idealistic musical movement as it reached its peak as a popular phenomenon. Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Howlin’ Wolf, Johnny Cash, the Staples Singers, Pete Seeger, Son House, and Peter, Paul and Mary were just a few of the legends who shared the stage at Newport, treating audiences to a range of folk music that encompassed the genre’s roots in blues, country, and gospel as well as its newer flirtations with rock ’n’ roll. Shooting in gorgeous black and white, Lerner juxtaposes performances with snapshot interviews with artists and their fans, weaving footage from four years of the festival into an intimate record of a pivotal time in music -- and in American culture at large. On DVD and Blu-ray, with a new, restored 2K digital transfer, approved by director Murray Lerner, and a new reconstruction and remastering of the monaural soundtrack using the original concert and field recordings, approved by Lerner and presented uncompressed on the Blu-ray. Extras: "When We Played Newport," a new program featuring archival interviews with Lerner, music festival producer George Wein, and musicians Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Buffy Saint-Marie, Pete Seeger, and Peter Yarrow; "Editing Festival,” a new program featuring Lerner, associate editor Alan Heim, and assistant editor Gordon Quinn; selection of complete outtake performances, including Clarence Ashley, Horton Barker, Johnny Cash, John Lee Hooker, and Odetta; a booklet featuring an essay by critic Amanda Petrusich and artist bios by folk music expert Mary Katherine Aldin. (The Criterion Collection).

  • The Resurrected

    (1991) John Terry, Jane Sibbett, Chris Sarandon, Laurie Briscoe, Robert Romanus. Since the beginning of time, man has struggled with death. Now Charles Dexter Ward (Sarandon), a wealthy scientist, may have found a way to beat it. Using an ancient diary and human remains, Ward begins a terrifying and bloody pursuit for immortality. By the time his wife Claire (Sibbett) hires private investigator John March (Terry) to halt the horrible experiments, it's too late ... the dead have been resurrected. Based on "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward" by H.P. Lovecraft. In a new 2K transfer from the film’s vaulted interpositive film element. Extras: New "Claire’s Conundrum"c interview with actress Jane Sibbett; new "The Strange Case of Charles Dexter Ward" interview with S.T. Joshi, author of "I Am Providence: The Life and Times of H.P. Lovecraft"; audio commentary with producers Mark Borde and Kenneth Raich, screenwriter Brent V. Friedman, actor Richard Romanus and make-up effects artist Todd Masters; "The Resurrected Man" interview with Chris Sarandon; "Abominations & Adaptations" interview with screenwriter Brent Friedman; "Grotesque Melodies" interview with composer Richard Band; "Lovecraftian Landscapes" interview with production designer Brent Thomas; "Human Experiments" interview with special effects artist Todd Masters; deleted and extended scenes from the workprint; home video trailer & Japanese trailer; photo gallery. (Scream Factory).


    September 19
  • Certain Women

    photo for Certain Women (2016) The expanses of the American West take center stage in this intimately observed triptych from Kelly Reichardt. Adapted from three short stories by Maile Meloy and unfolding in self-contained but interlocking episodes, "Certain Women" navigates the subtle shifts in personal desire and social expectation that unsettle the circumscribed lives of its characters: a lawyer (Laura Dern) forced to subdue a troubled client; a woman (Michelle Williams) whose plans to construct her dream home reveal fissures in her marriage; and a night-school teacher (Kristen Stewart) who forms a tenuous bond with a lonely ranch hand (Lily Gladstone), whose unguardedness and deep attachment to the land deliver an unexpected jolt of emotional immediacy. With unassuming craft, Reichardt captures the rhythms of daily life in small-town Montana through these fine-grained portraits of women trapped within the landscape’s wide-open spaces. On DVD and Blu-ray, with a new 2K digital transfer, supervised by director Kelly Reichardt and cinematographer Christopher Blauvelt, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interviews with the film’s cast and crew, including Reichardt and executive producer Todd Haynes; new interview with Maile Meloy, author of the stories on which the film is based; trailer; an essay by critic Ella Taylor. (The Criterion Collection).


    September 26
  • David Lynch: The Art of Life

    photo for David Lynch: The Art of Life (2016) A rare glimpse into the mind of one of cinema’s most enigmatic visionaries, "David Lynch: The Art Life" offers an absorbing portrait of the artist, as well as an intimate encounter with the man himself. >From the privacy of his home and painting studio in the Hollywood Hills, a candid Lynch conjures people and places from his past, from his boyhood in Idaho and Virginia to his experiences at art school in Boston and Philadelphia to the beginnings of his filmmaking career in Los Angeles -- in stories that unfold like scenes from his movies. This remarkable documentary by directors Jon Nguyen, Rick Barnes, and Olivia Neergaard-Holm reveals the story behind Lynch’s early years as a painter and director drawn to the phantasmagoric, while also illuminating his enduring commitment to what he calls “the art life”: “You drink coffee, you smoke cigarettes, and you paint, and that’s it.” On DVD and Blu-ray, in a high-definition digital transfer, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interview with co-director Jon Nguyen; a new essay by critic Dennis Lim. (The Criterion Collection).

  • The Piano Teacher

    photo for The Piano Teacher (2001) Academy Award–winning Austrian director Michael Haneke shifted his focus from the social to the psychological for this riveting study of female sexuality and the dynamics of control, an adaptation of a controversial 1983 novel by Elfriede Jelinek. Haneke finds his match in Isabelle Huppert, who delivers an icy but quietly seething performance as Erika, a middle-aged piano professor at a Viennese conservatory who lives with her mother, in a claustrophobically co-dependent relationship. Severely repressed, she satisfies her masochistic urges only voyeuristically until she meets Walter (Benoît Magimel), a young student whose desire for Erika leads to a destructive infatuation that upsets the careful equilibrium of her life. A critical breakthrough for Haneke, "The Piano Teacher" -- which won the Grand Prix as well as dual acting awards for its stars at Cannes -- is a formalist masterwork that remains a shocking sensation. On DVD and Blu-ray, with a new, restored 2K digital transfer, supervised by director Michael Haneke, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New interview with Haneke; new interview with actor Isabelle Huppert; selected-scene commentary from 2002 featuring Huppert; behind-the-scenes footage of a post-sync session for the film featuring Haneke and Huppert; trailer; an essay by scholar Moira Weigel. (The Criterion Collection).

  • photo for Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band BLU-RAY DEBUT

    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

    (1978) A musical spectacular featuring reinterpretations of over 20 classic Beatles songs. The one and only Billy Shears (multi-platinum recording artist Peter Frampton) and his best friends the Hendersons (Rock and Roll Hall of Famers The Bee Gees) are four young men from the quaint little town of Heartland. With superstardom calling, this fabulous foursome leaves Heartland -- and Billy’s beloved Strawberry Fields (Sandy Farina) -- vulnerable to mean Mr. Mustard, who steals Sgt. Pepper’s magical instruments for a fiendish plan that would, “poison young minds, pollute the environment, and subvert the democratic process.” It’s up to the four lads to save everything they hold dear with the power of music, kindness, and heart. Featuring performances by Aerosmith, George Burns, Steve Martin, Earth, Wind & Fire, and more, "Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band" is a magical, musical tour through some of the greatest songs ever written, and an astounding time capsule of the late 70s. Extras: Audio commentary with pop culture historian Russell Dyball, original theatrical trailer. (Shout! Factory).


    September 29
  • photo for Hype! [Collector’s Edition]

    Hype! [Collector’s Edition]

    (1996) It’s been just over 20 years since Doug Pray’s excellent documentary was released, capturing the story behind the organic rise of the influential movement that would come to be known as grunge. Fast forward to 2017, where the film is as relevant as ever, and will finally get its first Blu-ray release, as well as an updated DVD release. Drop into the Pacific Northwest in the early ’90s and watch a vibrant underground music scene explode into a global “grunge” media frenzy. "Hype!" follows the music from local bands playing for their friends, to Sub Pop Record’s brilliant exploitation of “the Seattle Sound,” to Nirvana's “Smells Like Teen Spirit” hitting #1 on the charts. Questions of money, authenticity, and fame arise as “grunge fashion” hits the runways and a mass migration of wanna-be Seattle bands saturates the city. The Northwest experience is one of humor, loss, and epic irony. "Hype!" showcases rare performance footage of Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, Nirvana (their first live performance of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” is here), Mudhoney, Supersuckers, The Young Fresh Fellows, Fastbacks, Seaweed, 7 Year Bitch, The Posies, The Gits, Flop, Gas Huffer, Love Battery, The MonoMen, Melvins, Blood Circus, Coffin Break, Dead Moon, Hammerbox, Some Velvet Sidewalk, Zipgun and Crackerbash. (Shout! Factory/Shout Select).


    October 3
  • 976-EVIL

    (1988) Stephen Geoffreys, Jim Metzler, Pat O'Bryan, Sandy Dennis. 976-EVIL is the number to dial to receive supernatural powers and turn into satanic killers. Hoax (Geoffreys) uses the powers the number gives him to exact revenge against everyone who has wronged him, inadvertently allowing his soul to be slowly taken over by Satan. Extras: New commentary with director Robert Englund and set decorator Nancy Booth Englund, alternate home video version of the film with 12 extra minutes of footage. (Sony).

  • Vampyr

    photo for Vampyr BLU-RAY DEBUT (1932 -- Germany) With "Vampyr," Danish filmmaker Carl Theodor Dreyer channeled his genius for creating mesmerizing atmosphere and austere, unsettling imagery into the horror genre. The result -- a chilling film about a student of the occult who encounters supernatural haunts and local evildoers in a village outside Paris -- is nearly unclassifiable. A host of stunning camera and editing tricks and densely layered sounds creates a mood of dreamlike terror. With its roiling fogs, ominous scythes, and foreboding echoes, "Vampyr" is one of cinema's greatest nightmares. Formats: High-definition digital transfer of the original German version of the film, from the 1998 restoration by Martin Koerber and the Cineteca di Bologna, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack. Extras: Alternate version with English text; audio commentary featuring film scholar Tony Rayns; "Carl Th. Dreyer," a 1966 documentary by Jørgen Roos chronicling Dreyer's career; video essay by scholar Casper Tybjerg on Dreyer's influences in creating "Vampyr"; radio broadcast from 1958 of Dreyer reading an essay about filmmaking; a booklet featuring essays by critics Mark Le Fanu and Kim Newman, a piece by Koerber on the restoration, and a 1964 interview with producer and actor Nicolas de Gunzburg; and a book featuring Dreyer and Christen Jul's original screenplay and Sheridan Le Fanu's 1872 story "Carmilla," a source for the film (The Criterion Collection)


    October 10
  • The Lure

    photo for The Lure (2015 -- Poland) This genre-defying horror-musical mash-up -- the bold debut of Polish director Agnieszka Smoczynska -- follows a pair of carnivorous mermaid sisters drawn ashore to explore life on land in an alternate 1980s Poland. Their tantalizing siren songs and otherworldly auras make them overnight sensations as nightclub singers in the half-glam, half-decrepit world of Smoczynska's imagining. The director gives fierce teeth to her viscerally sensual, darkly feminist twist on Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid," in which the girls' bond is tested and their survival threatened after one sister falls for a human. A coming-of-age fairy tale with a catchy synth-fueled soundtrack, outrageous song-and-dance numbers, and lavishly grimy sets, The Lure explores its themes of emerging female sexuality, exploitation, and the compromises of adulthood with savage energy and originality. Formats: High-definition digital master, supervised by director of photography Kuba Kijowski, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray. Extras: New program about the making of the film, featuring interviews with director Agnieszka Smoczynska, actors Marta Mazurek and Michalina Olszanska, screenwriter Robert Bolesto, Kijowski, composers Barbara and Zuzanna Wronski, sound designer Marcin Lenarczyk, and choreographer Kaya Kolodziejczyk; deleted scenes; "Aria Diva" (2007) and "Viva Maria!" (2010), two short films directed by Smoczynska; an essay by writer Angela Lovell. (The Criterion Collection)

  • photo for Othello

    Othello

    (1952/1955) Gloriously cinematic despite being made on a tiny budget, Orson Welles's "Othello" is a testament to the filmmaker's stubborn willingness to pursue his vision to the ends of the earth. Unmatched in his passionate identification with Shakespeare's imagination, Welles brings his inventive visual approach to this enduring tragedy of jealousy, bigotry, and rage, and also gives a towering performance as the Moor of Venice, alongside Suzanne Cloutier as his innocent wife, Desdemona, and Micheál MacLiammóir as the scheming Iago. Shot over the course of three years in Morocco, Venice, Tuscany, and Rome and plagued by many logistical problems, this fiercely independent film joins "Macbeth" and "Chimes at Midnight" in making the case for Welles as the cinema's most audacious interpreter of the Bard. New, restored 4K digital transfers of two versions of the film, the 1952 European version and the 1955 U.S. version, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks. Extras: Audio commentary featuring filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich and Orson Welles scholar Myron Meisel; "Return to Glennascaul," a 1953 short film made by MacLiammóir and actor Hilton Edwards during a hiatus from shooting "Othello"; new interview with Welles biographer Simon Callow; new interview with Welles scholar François Thomas on the differences between the two versions; new interview with Ayanna Thompson, author of "Passing Strange: Shakespeare, Race, and Contemporary America"; interview from 2014 with Welles scholar Joseph McBride; an essay by film critic Geoffrey O'Brien. (The Criterion Collection).


    October 17
  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

    photo for Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me BLU-RAY DEBUT (1992) In the town of Twin Peaks, everyone has their secrets -- but especially Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). In this prequel to his groundbreaking 1990s television series, David Lynch resurrects the teenager found wrapped in plastic at the beginning of the show, following her through the last week of her life and teasing out the enigmas that surround her murder. Homecoming queen by day and drug-addicted thrill seeker by night, Laura leads a double life that pulls her deeper and deeper into horror as she pieces together the identity of the assailant who has been terrorizing her for years. Nightmarish in its vision of an innocent torn apart by unfathomable forces, "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" is nevertheless one of Lynch's most humane films, aching with compassion for its tortured heroine -- a character as enthralling in life as she was in death. Formats: Restored 4K digital transfer, supervised by director David Lynch; 7.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray, supervised by Lynch; alternate original 2.0 surround soundtrack, presented in DTS-HD Master Audio on the Blu-ray. Extras: "The Missing Pieces," 90 minutes of deleted and alternate takes from the film, assembled by Lynch; new interview with actor Sheryl Lee; interviews from 2014 by Lynch with actors Lee, Ray Wise, and Grace Zabriskie; an interview with Lynch from the 2005 edition of filmmaker and writer Chris Rodley's book "Lynch on Lynch." (The Criterion Collection)


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